H O W   I T   W O R K S

 


Dan will arrive at an event location either a couple of hours or the evening before the event begins. He will set up his equipment, stretch his canvas, and begin to paint. 


His first preference

is to paint exactly

what \he sees from

where he stands at

the event. People

really enjoy watching

the event they are

attending come to

life on the canvas. 

If this is not practical he can paint from preselected photographs, or from subject matter agreed to by the event organizers.


While he is painting, he plays recorded music--mostly relaxing ambient/jazz/traditional and world music.  Dan is also a gifted musician, and for an additional charge he can add musical performance to his act.  That means that every 5 or 10 minutes he picks up one of his instruments and plays a jazz/pop standard on either trumpet/flugelhorn, flute or whistles, bluesharp/harmonica, or guitars.


It usually takes Dan a full day to complete a painting, and although it can be done more quickly, he prefers to work on a piece of art for 2 or 3 days.  He paints in either acrylic OR oil, depending on the subject matter, the preferred style, and the weather. (Oil is the only option in very wet weather.)


When the event is over, Dan will roll up the canvas and deliver it to the responsible party. For an additional charge he can stretch the canvas/canvasses and deliver them to the buyers.

VIEW THIS MOVIE TO WATCH DAN WORK ON THIS 4-BY-5-FOOT PAINTING ON HIS SMALLER KIT

THE DOGWOOD FESTIVAL

Fayetteville, NC April 2009

MARKET HOUSE

Fayetteville, NC April 2009

 

REPORT FROM THE DOGWOOD FESTIVAL . . .

Fayetteville, North Carolina, April 25 & 26


What a great festival!  It is SO apparent that Fayetteville has worked really hard on its “curb appeal” over the past several years.  Everywhere you turn there are new and newly renovated buildings going up all over town--especially in their historic downtown.  And it’s clear that they have gone all out to make this festival the crown jewel of their public image.  Way to go, Fayetteville!  We had a great time!


Our sponsors at the festival--Up & Coming Weekly--wanted me to do half the canvas en plein aire, depicting the festival from where I stood, and the other half some familiar landmark of the city.  Well, if you’ve ever been there, you know Fayetteville’s most recognizable landmark is the Market House, so that is what I featured on the other half of the canvas.

The hot sun had gone down . . . the main stage had gone dark

. . . the people had had their fill of corn dogs and elephant ears

. . . and we were all just ready for some peace and beauty.


For about an hour and a half 200 people stood, sat, and laid around listening to the gorgeous music coming from my sound system and watching me paint their town icon--the Market House. 


It was an absolutely magic moment.


Ahh!  Now THAT’S what all that preparation was for!


THANKS, Fayetteville!  I look forward to next year!

THE DRAMATIC BEGINNING

One of the phrases I use to describe my presentation is “Well, it’s not rock and roll.” It’s not designed to give you a sudden spike of adrenaline. In the planet I live on, most people need more peace, not less. Having said that, however, I should note that the beginning of my painting process is pretty exciting--

LOTS of movement . . . paint and rollers and spray bottles flying . . . crazy mixing of colors . . .  At least my adrenaline is spiked!

Big thanks to Chrisie Council for shooting this opening sequence of my work at the 30th Annual Artsplosure in Raleigh, NC. 

VIEW THIS VIDEO TO WATCH DAN WORK ON THIS 8-BY-10-FOOT PAINTING ON HIS BIG RIG